First Home Buying

 

First Time Buyer Guide


What Is a Mortgage in Principle?

Mortgages will be at the top of your priority list when looking to buy a house. In your search for the best mortgage product to meet your needs, you’re likely to come across the term Mortgage in Principle. Sometimes they’re also referred to as Decision in Principle (DIP) or Agreement in Principle (AIP).
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Basically, regardless of the name, it’s a first agreement – or declaration – from a lender consenting to let you borrow a certain amount of money to buy a home.

How Does a Mortgage in Principle Work?

A mortgage in principle is a quick matter that will let you know, within less than 30 minutes, whether you’re eligible for a mortgage and how much money you can borrow.

In order to find out your borrowing potential, the lender will need:

  • Proof of your income and your outgoings
  • Your address history
  • Your credit score (a credit check will be provided by the credit reference agency of their choice)

Once the procedure is completed, the lender will be able to tell you how much you can borrow and give you a certificate: you can now prove to the seller and the estate agent that you’re able to get a mortgage and are ready to buy.

A mortgage in principle is usually valid for 60 to 90 days. You can apply for more than one if it expires before you need to use it, but you should know that applying for too many could lower your credit score.

Mortgage in Principle vs Mortgage Offer

Bear in mind though, that having a mortgage in principle doesn’t guarantee getting a formal mortgage offer. Let’s look at the differences between the two:

  • A mortgage in principle means that you have successfully completed the initial credit and affordability checks, but you will still need to produce the necessary documents to confirm all the numbers you have been approved on. The lender is basically telling you how much they’re ready to lend you “in principle”.
  • A mortgage offer means that the mortgage application process has been completed: both, the valuation of the property and all checks, have been carried out by the lender, and they are now officially confirming that they’ll lend you money.